Symposium and Phaedrus (Dover Thrift Editions)

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Two important dialogues offer crucial insights into mystical and aesthetic aspects of Platonic doctrine. Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition: The Odyssey by Homer , Paperback.

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To be clear, I'm giving The Symposium 5 stars, not Phaedrus. The Symposium was a delight to read! I absolutely loved it. Phaedrus was okay, but I think Plato has much better dialogues, honestly.

Six Great Dialogues Apology, Crito, Phaedo, Phaedrus, Symposium, The Republic Dover Thrift Editions

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First things first, the reason I found this translation so smooth and entertaining is the language, this is by far the easiest English book I've read. Phaedrus an idealist states that an army made up entirely of lovers would be the ultimate force against a state's foes, because a lover wouldn't dare t On the Symposium: Phaedrus an idealist states that an army made up entirely of lovers would be the ultimate force against a state's foes, because a lover wouldn't dare to abandon his boyfriend in battle or even dare to show cowardliness, lest being unworthy of the love.

Pausanias a realist says that there are two Aphrodites, heavenly and common. The one Heavenly is associated with the love of the soul and the common, the love of the body.

9780486277981 - Symposium and Phaedrus (Dover Thrift Editions) by Plato

He also adds that there "isn't one single form of love" and that "love is neither right not wrong in itself" and "It is wrong if you satisfy the wrong person". He defines the wrong person as the one who loves what isn't lasting, the body, rather than the mind. According to Pausanias, the right kind of love is to love the goodness in your lover in order to learn from him and his wisdom.

Socrates defines Eros as the love of something you desire and obviously what you desire, you lack and that a wise man can't desire to be wise, since he is wise already and a foolish man can't desire what he doesn't value. So, it must be one of the intermediate class who desires something, because he is neither ignorant nor in possession of what he wants.

He also says that man is capable of producing physical and mental offsprings.

- Symposium and Phaedrus (Dover Thrift Editions) by Plato

Physical offspring is ordinary children. Mental offspring is our achievements in life, and both are produced in pursuit of immortality. This was just a quick review of what happened on that splendid supper and I would happily read the Symposium again in the future. A conversation between Socrates and his friend Phaedrus on love, speech-making, the soul, reincarnation and writing. Socrates despises desire as a form of excess and that it brings ruin to men in different aspects of life including love and food. Socrates' picture of the soul is a winged form in the heavens with a chariot and two horses following whatever a god it prefers, and that whenever a soul descends to the earth and posses a body it begins to imitate the god it has followed before its earthly birth.

On the writing matter, Socrates doesn't approve of whatever is written because in his mind, writing produces forgetfulness and "disuse of memory" and that people would rely on what is written to acquire knowledge rather than experiencing things themselves. Finally, the scientific way of speaking or writing according to Socrates is to know the truth of what you say, to be able to define everything you say and to know whom to address this speech to.

I really find the Symposium to be more entertaining. The Phaedrus is just so rich with different topics and I guess I will have to read it again to ensure my full understanding. Jan 21, Pierre E. View all 6 comments. Jul 26, Nik Kane rated it it was ok Shelves: The Platonic dialogue "Symposium" starts out sounding like a manifesto for NAMBLA then becomes a foofaraw in which the literal and the metaphorical are purposely conflated for rhetorical advantage before finally getting to a half-dozen pages of fairly interesting philosophizing and then degrading into a stroke fest extolling the virtues of Socrates.

Oct 04, Jill rated it did not like it. May 02, Aneece rated it it was amazing Shelves: Like mid-career Eddie Murphy, Socrates lived to provoke. Unlike late-career Eddie Murphy, he died for it, too. Feb 13, Christine rated it it was amazing. I read The Symposium - awesome! Jul 12, Clark Maddux rated it it was amazing.

Since I have the privilege of teaching a class again this fall, I thought to my self, "Self, what better time to teach one of the best kept secrets of narrative art in the western world? Framed by the comical beginning with Aristodemus believing t Since I have the privilege of teaching a class again this fall, I thought to my self, "Self, what better time to teach one of the best kept secrets of narrative art in the western world?

Framed by the comical beginning with Aristodemus believing that the wisdom of Socrates can be gained through mimicry and the darkly humorous end with Alcibiades raging about the one love he has never had, and foreshadowing the farce of Syracuse in the process , the love of philosophy is made a means to an end.

The chief irony of this reading, of course, is that Plato himself becomes that poetic figure that he would have banished from his own Utopia--a pagan Moses standing on the height of Pisgah, never to enter the world of wisdom of which he dreamed. Esto siempre y cuando se hable en conceptos que dependan de cierta subjetividad.


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Nov 19, George Simopoulos rated it really liked it. Following his excellent method of Socratic dialogues, Plato discusses the origins, concepts and the kinds of love. Symposium hangs between reality and myth, with the participants of the dialogues to contribute their own views about love. Through the dialogues, the reader is not overwhelmed by strict philosophical context, but he is given insight to the daily life of the ancient Athenians with short refreshing breaks from the contemplation.


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  • Phaedrus talks about the concepts of lover and non-lover Following his excellent method of Socratic dialogues, Plato discusses the origins, concepts and the kinds of love. Phaedrus talks about the concepts of lover and non-lover, but also Socrates Plato analyzes the functions of rhetoric and writing and whether an orator or writer should be allowed to implement these functions.

    Finally, sometimes as usual the discourses become confusing to the common reader, but the meaning is easily comprehensible at the end.

    Oct 14, Troy rated it really liked it Shelves: Not a bad pair of dialogues. I've heard Plato was an easy read compared to Aristotle, and this is my first good look at the Socratic method of Dialectic. I got the feel from reading this that it was an English translation of a Latin translation from the original Greek, but Plato's meaning was made quite clear. I also got a good feel for Plato's arguments, but couldn't help but notice his apparent tendency to put words in Socrates' mouth