The First Rule (Jasmines Odyssey Book 1)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The First Rule (Jasmines Odyssey Book 1) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The First Rule (Jasmines Odyssey Book 1) book. Happy reading The First Rule (Jasmines Odyssey Book 1) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The First Rule (Jasmines Odyssey Book 1) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The First Rule (Jasmines Odyssey Book 1) Pocket Guide.

She loves writing hot, sexy romances. More about Joey W. When Denise Rossetti was very small, she had an aunt who would tell her the most wonderful fairy tales -… More about Denise Rossetti. Hill and Denise Rossetti Category: About Laced with Desire What a hot foursome!

Hill , Denise Rossetti. About Denise Rossetti When Denise Rossetti was very small, she had an aunt who would tell her the most wonderful fairy tales -… More about Denise Rossetti. Inspired by Your Browsing History. English Choose a language for shopping.


  • Northern Dance No. 3 in G major - From La Tersicore del Nord Op. 147!
  • Product details;
  • Bare-Bones Meditation: Waking Up from the Story of My Life.

Not Enabled Word Wise: Not Enabled Screen Reader: Enabled Amazon Best Sellers Rank: Would you like to report this content as inappropriate? Do you believe that this item violates a copyright? Amazon Music Stream millions of songs. Amazon Drive Cloud storage from Amazon. Alexa Actionable Analytics for the Web. AmazonGlobal Ship Orders Internationally. Amazon Inspire Digital Educational Resources. Amazon Rapids Fun stories for kids on the go. Amazon Restaurants Food delivery from local restaurants.

Laced with Desire

ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics. East Dane Designer Men's Fashion. Book of Wonders is an enjoyable middle grade fantasy inspired by the Arabian Nights stories. The main characters were very likable and I enjoyed the author's descriptions of all the exotic places they visited. This book is very different from anything I have read recently, and since I am sick of urban fantasy I am always looking for fantasy with a more historical or magical setting.

If you are like me and enjoy fantasy with unusual settings, I think you would enjoy Book of Wonders. Review copy provided by publisher. Nov 21, Grady McCallie rated it it was ok.


  • Remember Muckadilla: People, Properties, Businesses and Sporting Events.
  • Besten Erotischen Geschichten vol 1 (German Edition)?
  • The Army in the Civil War.. ([c1885]) Volume: 1?
  • .
  • .
  • The Book of Wonders by Jasmine Richards!
  • See a Problem?.

I'm a fan of much of the Arabian Nights, and was delighted to run across this middle grade novel, which repurposes elements from the tales -- Sinbad, djinnis, the roc, mistaken identities, wishes governed by complicated rules -- but without the racism and misogyny that permeates the original tales. So far, so good. But, the book's writing leaves much to be desired. Rather than the characters' personalities driving the plot, the plot and author's need to work in exposition drives the characte I'm a fan of much of the Arabian Nights, and was delighted to run across this middle grade novel, which repurposes elements from the tales -- Sinbad, djinnis, the roc, mistaken identities, wishes governed by complicated rules -- but without the racism and misogyny that permeates the original tales.

Rather than the characters' personalities driving the plot, the plot and author's need to work in exposition drives the characterization completely - in a given scene, the heroine goes from disgusted at the thought of the evil sultan, to grumbling about having to help with dinner, to tearing up at how infrequently she sees her father, to 'happy but guilty' when her grandmother praises her skills with a kitchen knife. That's in roughly two pages. It's like watching a train pass by: In looking at other reviews, I see that this is labelled 'middle grade' rather than 'young adult'.

I guess that's younger than young adult, and I can see why an author would tailor the plot and characters for the audience. But surely these readers can handle - and would thrive on - better characterization than this. May 07, Madeline J. Rose rated it it was amazing Shelves: Still love it as much as I did when I was younger. When her own beloved sister is captured by the ev Re-read Low Lights - There are some pretty intense parts and I found myself twisting my hair and fumbling my fingers.

irideryjawex.tk | books library

Lots and lots of magic. And that kinda of ruined it for me. Some is just crazy. Let it make you stronger and smarter. The story is riveting and there are no curse words that I can remember. But the magic at times made me feel a little uncomfortable. Other than that, I definitely recommend this book! View all 3 comments. Jul 26, Abby rated it it was amazing.

I read The Book of Wonders in manuscript form a little while ago. It is a page turning and gripping adventure that pulls the reader in. The young Scheherazade is a brilliant heroine and the plot is filled with twists and turns right to the very end. I finished it in one sitting and can't wait to read the next installment in the trilogy.

Oct 04, Betsy rated it liked it Shelves: Enjoyable enough but maybe one of the most forgettable little middle grade novels I've ever read. Aug 22, Cynthia Varady rated it liked it. For the duel, visit Dueling Librarians Let me begin by saying that it pains me to write this review. I begin all books with the anticipation and zest of a child awakening on Christmas morning, bursting to see what all those glossy packages might contain. This is perhaps a faulty way to begin a book because my expectation can fall short, leaving me less than happy by the tale's end.

A victim of circumstance, I foun For the duel, visit Dueling Librarians Let me begin by saying that it pains me to write this review. A victim of circumstance, I found Wonders to be tedious. I think part of the problem is having just completed a book I found so amazing, that almost anything that came directly after would have been lacking in the Wow Department. I really wanted Wonders to knock my socks off, but instead I was left mildly irritated. Wonders follows the tradition of 1, Arabian Nights. In Richards' adaptation of the famous collection of folk tales, we find some familiar characters.

With her is Rhidan, the silver haired foundling who is searching for his people. Along the way the youngsters meet Sinbad the sailor and his motley crew of pirates. The bulk of Wonders retells the second voyage in the Sinbad series, which shares some of the same elements as Homer's Odyssey , another story I always found tedious.

Scheherazade, Rhidan, and Sinbad, and his crew become shipwrecked on Desolation Island where giant rocs rule the skies, and demon-like serpents lurk beneath the earth in a maze of tunnels. It was this part of the story that really began to bog down for me. I felt like I was trapped on the island with them, which from a artistic point of view is great, but from a trying-to-get-through-this-book angle, not so good.

In addition to some of the same characters as 1, Nights , Wonders follows ending format as well. For those of you not familiar with the original folk collection, here's a quick recap. To avoid the fate of her predecessors, Scheherazade tells the king a story which she doesn't finish until the following night, only to begin a new tale which she fails to complete.

This goes on for, you guessed it, 1, nights. I respect what Richards is doing in The Book of Wonders , it just wasn't for me. I think this is a great book for young readers. It provides amazing imagery, lots of drama and action, and it will introduce them to a classic with a new twist. Plus Scheherazade and Rhidan are accessible characters that many tweens and early teens will be able to relate to. For the duel, visit Dueling Librarians Jan 30, Cesya rated it it was amazing Shelves: Now, on with the show.

I have to say, she was very brave for only being thirteen and I admired her for that. She was a little firecracker and when she set her mind to doing something, she followed through until it was finished. At that age, I was all talk and a big pile of—excuse my French—chicken shit. Another thing I really like about Zardi is that family and friends were her main priority.

Next, we have Ridhan. I failed to mention Sinbad was in this story. If you have children in that age range at home or you want to jump into a different genre for a day, I suggest picking up The Book of Wonders because of the wonderful mysteries written on its pages.

Dec 04, Kristen rated it really liked it Shelves: Just reading the description of The Book of Wonders gives me a sense of adventure. When I heard the name Sinbad, it brought me to think about Aladdin and the other tales of Arabian Nights and made me more excited to read this book.

I was drawn in from the beginning. Richards sets up a rich world, full of an evil sultan, a deadly hunt, and a boy with a mysterious past. Zardi sees her own sister and father captured before her and decides to embark on a journey to fi First Impression: Zardi sees her own sister and father captured before her and decides to embark on a journey to find a group of people opposed to the sultan.

If she can find them, she can stop her family from dying at the sultan's hands. Her adopted brother Rhidan follows her, curious about his origins and together they set off to sea. Their journey takes them far, as Rhidan discovers his magic and blows them to an unknown land filled with huge birds and snakes at war with one another, along with a Cyclops and a dijinni.

The Book of Wonders captured my attention from page one, but I found that when they weren't in the middle of an adventure or in danger, the book started to drag on a bit. The main characters were colorful, but the side characters sometimes I couldn't really remember - mostly the sailors. Even with its flaws, this book has laid a solid foundation for the next book while still resolving some of the plot by the end, which made me happy.

I was hoping not to have to wait that long to see what would happen. A solid fantasy novel, full of adventure, colorful villians and characters, and lots of magic.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Jan 06, Vivien rated it really liked it. Zardi lives in a world with Magic, Djinn, Ogres, and Sorcerers. However, the Sultan has banned magic in the kingdom of Arribitha. Even speaking of magic, could get you arrested. Zardi has a mysterious companion in Rhidan, who was abandoned as a baby.

When given a clue about his past, by Sinbad the sailor, he is compelled to find the answers. In Arribitha the Sultan forces young girls in the position of 'praisemaker'. The young girls are held captive and eventually executed. When Zardi's sister is captured by the evil Sultan, she knows she must go to any length to rescue her. Together, Zardi and Rhidan set off on a journey that will forever change them.

Though sometimes their journey will separate them, they will battle through the trials. A great new middle grade fantasy novel.

Related Articles

I loved the world it was set in. I only wish that there had been more revealed about Aladdin.

Wizard's First Rule (Sword of Truth #1) by Terry Goodkind Audiobook Full 1/3

I only hope there is more from this series to further develop that aspect. A page turner from the start, I was hooked from the beginning and think fans of this genre will surely enjoy! Feb 08, Ms. Yingling rated it really liked it. Zardi enjoys her life in Arribithia with her grandmother, older sister Zubeyda and her friend Rhidan, a foreign orphan being raised by her family.

Rhidan doesn't know his part, but when the two run into the sailor Sinbad in the port, he mentions that Rhidan looks like the people of the Black Isle. Zardi's father is an advisor for the sultan, who has banned magic from the kingdom, but not even this keeps the family safe-- Zubeyda is chosen to be the sultan's next "praisemaker" which will result i Zardi enjoys her life in Arribithia with her grandmother, older sister Zubeyda and her friend Rhidan, a foreign orphan being raised by her family.

The Book of Wonders

Zardi's father is an advisor for the sultan, who has banned magic from the kingdom, but not even this keeps the family safe-- Zubeyda is chosen to be the sultan's next "praisemaker" which will result in her being imprisoned and then hunted to the death. Zardi thinks that Sinbad would be able to help both with getting Rhidan back to his people and in overturning the sultan, so they hop a boat in search of him.

They end up having many adventures, finding out about Rhidan's past, fighting magical creatures, and eventually getting back to the kingdom just as Zubeyda is being hunted. While things may be okay at home, Rhidan is still interested in the Black Isle, so the book ends with an elipsis The setting and stories reminiscent of the Arabian Nights lends a fresh twist to this fantasy quest. Getting very weary of typical Celtic fantasy, but I can't think of anything with Sinbad, and this is quite well done.

I felt that I was missing many of the Arabian Nights references. Sep 22, Heather rated it liked it Shelves: It took me until the end of chapter 3 to get interested in the story and the characters, but chapter 4 really set things up well and I was anticipating quite an adventure. Unfortunately, although I really wanted to like this one, it just didn't do it for me. The premise is clever, but I found myself with so many questions, particularly the character motivations. My favorite character in the book - and the only one whose motivation I totally get - was Nonna Zardi's grandmother and we don't see It took me until the end of chapter 3 to get interested in the story and the characters, but chapter 4 really set things up well and I was anticipating quite an adventure.

My favorite character in the book - and the only one whose motivation I totally get - was Nonna Zardi's grandmother and we don't see her again after Zardi and Ridhan begin their adventure. As for the rest, I never understood what drove the sultan, Sinbad, the various djinnis, and most of the other characters. I really wanted to know why. Why is the sultan so cruel? Why don't the people rebel? Why are the soldiers loyal to the sultan? Why did magicians trap the djinnis? Why was Ridhan left in this country?

Why was magic forbidden?