Brutto tempo, che fare? (Italian Edition)

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The verbs are conjugated the same as any other regular —are or —ere verb that you are familiar with, except that they are only ever conjugated in the third person singular. Hannah Jackel spent nine lovely months in Viterbo, Italy studying abroad, where she fell in love with the Italian language, culture and food.

She shares her passion for all things Italian by writing and editing for The Iceberg Project. OK, a new weather word I just learned on Il Meteo — sciabolata. I come from Las Vegas. Your email address will not be published.

How to Talk About the Weather in Italian (with 16 Phrases for Making Small Talk)

We will be on our way to building complex sentences and speaking more like we do in our native language! This post is the 14th in a series that originated in our Conversational Italian! Our group has had a chance to use these phrases. Now I am posting them on this blog for everyone to try! This will lead into: How is the Weather? As noted in the first two blogs on the topic of the verb fare…. In fact, the Italian verb fare has so many uses in Italian, many of which do not translate directly into English, that we must really learn to think in Italian to master the use of this verb.

What I am doing. For a general assessment of the weather, Italians use the ever popular verb fare in the third person singular, which you will remember is fa. Below are some examples of how this works. What weather does it make? It is bad weather. It makes bad weather. It is bad outside. To talk about the weather in the past tense, we must return to our two well known past tense forms — the imperfetto and the passato prossimo.

If you can learn to use the verb fare in these expressions that describe the weather, you will have really learned to think in Italian! This post is the 13th in a series that originated in our Conversational Italian! We will discuss the Italian expressions for our everyday experience: As noted in the first blog on the topic of the verb fare…. In most cases, the place to obtain groceries is known by both speakers, and so the actual place is omitted. If one is going to shop for non — grocery items, there are several phrases that can be used. Two phrases can be used for shopping in general, for any purchase: Notice that the English translations are all basically the same, although in Italian it is possible to convey what type of shopping is being done by the phrase chosen.

So, in this case, all of our shopping expressions can be translated as: I shop, I do shop, I am shopping. And finally, if you happen to be shopping for some wonderful Italian clothes in a small Italian shop, here are some useful expressions from our Conversational Italian for Travelers Just the Important Phrases book: If you can learn to use the verb fare and these shopping expressions, you will have really learned to think in Italian!

Stay tuned for even more blog posts on this topic! This post is the 12th in a series that originated in our Conversational Italian! Read below for many but certainly not all of the phrases that use fare. Do you remember these phrases from our blog: We revisit these important phrases now that we are discussing fare! Notice how qualche is always followed by a singular noun.

Many other expressions related to going and doing something use fare, with the translation of to take, as follows. Both meanings are expressed with the same Italian phrase. The last group of phrases are helpful for tourists if they want help taking a picture of their favorite location or making a telephone call. If you can learn to use the verb fare in these expressions, you will have really learned to think in Italian!

This post is the 11th in a series that originates from our Conversational Italian! Try my method, and let me know how it works. The helping verb will be essere, and the past participle is the irregular successo. In fact, three of the most commonly spoken phrases where che is used in this way are the ones we are working on! Many times, when Italians ask a question, they start the sentence with the verb and leave out che, as in these common phrases: Whenever someone asks a question in Italian, of course, they will expect to hear an answer!

You may receive one of the general answers below: Everything is all right. Everything is going well. Or, maybe you already know the information someone is talking about. A relative or a friend, perhaps, has done something that is no surprise to you. Once someone has conveyed to you what has happened, you will want to let them know that you understand the situation!

Below are some easy answers you can give to relay the idea that you have understood what is going on. At the end of the list, there are additional questions you can use to ask someone else if they have understood something. Remember these phrases, and I guarantee you will use them every da y! So… I guess I have to change my introductory line to…. It seems that almost every day I discover something that I did not know about before.

Italian Present Tense 4 Irregular Verbs -ERE Essere Avere

To complete the sentence, just add what you realize in the phrase that follows! Below are example sentences to show how this all works. These example sentences are true for me.

To think of more examples, and try to describe what you realize about yourself! I realize that I have an hour to make dinner. I realize that I have an hour to prepare dinner. I realize that you have an hour to prepare dinner. I realize that I will always want to learn more about the Italian language. Again, an example from my life, taking from a time when I was when talking a good friend of mine about a certain movie.

How to Talk About the Weather in Italian (with 16 Phrases for Making Small Talk)

Try to think of some examples from your own life! Mi accorgo che ti piace molto questo film. Vuoi andare a vederlo con me? I notice that you really like this film. Do you want to go to see it with me? This, of course, involves conjugating our two verbs in the past tense! The past participle for rendersi is the irregular verb reso, and the ending will need to change to reflect the speaker when using the passato prossimo.

To complete the sentence, just add what you have realized in the phrase that follows! Below is a table to summarize these phrases of realizing and noticing. Listen carefully for these phrases and then try to use them yourself! Notice that as a female I have to use resa and accorta. How many more examples can you think of? Ieri sera, a Capodanno, mi sono resa conto che sono molto fortunata. Mi sono resa conto di avere amici molto cari. I realized that I have many dear friends.

Mi sono resa conto che ho molti cari amici. I realized that I have learned so many important things from my family. Mi sono accorta che era molto freddo a Capodanno.

Italian verbs

Remember these verb phrases, and I guarantee you will use them every day! But this verb is actually the way Italians express the idea that they like something. Once we tap into the Italian way of thinking and learn a few simple examples, it becomes easy to express how much we have liked things in Italian!

Then, we will focus on how to use this verb in the past tense. In English, when we say we like something, we mention two things: But in Italian, the indirect object is used instead of the direct object, to describe by whom the thing is liked or to whom it is pleasing. The tricky thing about this type of phrase in Italian is that the conjugation of piacere will have to agree with the number of things that are being liked.

So, if one thing is liked, or an infinitive verb follows, piace is used for the present tense. Italians then put an indirect object pronoun mi, ti, Le, le, gli, ci, vi, or gli before the verb, at the beginning of the sentence, to denote to whom the thing was pleasing. The necklace was pleasing to you. You liked the necklace. The dress was pleasing to us. We liked the dress. The book was pleasing to you all. You all liked the book. The necklace was pleasing to them. They liked the necklace.

The necklaces were pleasing to you. You liked the necklaces. Ci sono piaciuti i vestiti. The dresses were pleasing to us. We liked the dresses. Vi sono piaciuti i libri. The books were pleasing to you all.

You all liked the books. Gli sono piaciute le collane. The necklaces were pleasing to them. They liked the necklaces. They end their time together in Chapters 16—18 with a family dinner at a wonderful restaurant, where they describe to the waiter all the dishes that they have liked. As always, the more we read, listen, and try to speak about what we have liked, the easier it will be to remember these phrases automatically.

Christmas-time is still my favorite time of the year. Excitement builds at my home in the beginning of December with the familiar sounds of decorations being hauled out of storage and fixed to their usual places on the fireplace and the stairway. We listen to our favorite music as we trim the Christmas tree and try not to argue too much about where each ornament should go. And, of course, every Sunday from Thanksgiving until the New Year, smells of the traditional Italian cookies that my mother, children, and I prepare as Christmas treats permeate the household.

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. What is the Weather Doing? It is nice weather. It makes nice weather.

Everything you need to know to enjoy your trip to Italy!

Below are typical questions about the weather, this time in the past tense: What was the weather? What weather did it make? Come era il tempo? How was the weather? And our answers, depending on the situation… Faceva caldo. Ha fatto caldo tutto il giorno.

It was hot all day. Ha fatto fresco ieri. It was cool yesterday. It was cold all winter. It was nice weather.