A Prologue (Age of Refinery Book 1)

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BOOKS -for profit, of course. With a low budget and poor planning , a group of rag-tag adventurers from different natinalities is assembled and send to the unknow. There are action, bad things, and silly humor. Well, no supernatural except for the Mages , more kind of shamanic, sensitives to monsters and do invocations. Lalli, the cat-like character, is a favorite. No issues with a woman leading the expedition though she is very gryffindor-ish not vey wise.

I got some problems to discern male and female characters, androginous are us maybe. Supe de esta serie por una de esas recomendaciones de GR who knew! Denle una oportunidad, los personajes tienen todos su propia personalidad bastante humana Dec 06, Heidi rated it really liked it Shelves: Extremely slow plot-wise, but I find myself not minding because of the gorgeous art and interesting Nordic world building.

Feb 06, Hackmops rated it it was amazing Shelves: Amazing webcomic with an unique setting and great atmosphere. Beautiful artwork and it has MAPS. Feb 27, Tamma rated it it was amazing Shelves: I'm reading this as an ongoing webcomic at http: The comments section is also an amazing exception to the internet's general don't read the comments rule. People have good conversations there. I'm into reading outside of the Western-European yawnsies these days. The characters are from different geographic areas and spe I'm reading this as an ongoing webcomic at http: The characters are from different geographic areas and speak different languages; language barriers are an important thing in the story.

Jan 19, Kira rated it it was amazing. Which is a big deal, because I read a lot of webcomics. Print copies aren't available right now, but you can buy it as an e-book or just read the whole story online at sssscomic. And oh, yeah, the most beautiful art I've ever seen in a graphic novel. Trust me, it's worth reading. Jan 04, Lilian rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is such a gorgeous comic, with a lovely story line. It's available online, but the print edition is also wonderful - a delightfully solid hardback with good quality paper worthy of the art.

I'm considering sleeping cuddled up with it tonight Dec 26, Emma rated it really liked it Shelves: I neeed this as a book. Sep 23, Tym rated it it was amazing Shelves: Amazing art, cool world and fun characters. Dec 31, Maggie Gordon rated it it was amazing Shelves: I am constantly amazed at just how amazing webcomics can be. Stand Still, Stay Silent is about a dystopian future centered on the Nordic countries.

There's weird magic and language barriers and beautiful landscapes. Both gorgeously told and expertly illustrated, Sundberg should have publishers banging down her door. Unfortunately, it's a bit hard to track down this book as it is a Hiveworks publication, but I would very much recommend given I am constantly amazed at just how amazing webcomics can be. Unfortunately, it's a bit hard to track down this book as it is a Hiveworks publication, but I would very much recommend given the excellent production values!

Feb 19, Anna rated it really liked it. Jun 23, Becky rated it it was amazing Shelves: Reread almost as soon as I got in print. Such an exciting setting and winning blend of humor, friendship, and horror. Sep 05, Meira readingbooksinisrael rated it really liked it Shelves: If it were for the artwork alone I would give it 5 stars.

Book One is Chapter if you're reading the. Nov 11, Elizabeth rated it really liked it Shelves: Very slow to start. The prelude isn't necessary to read, as the main story jumps 90 years in the future. An easy gradual read. Never felt the need to binge, just read a few pages a day or week. May 30, Emmie rated it really liked it Shelves: It was world building in a world very similar to ours. I would have rather seen those pages devoted to building the world after the sickness.

Still it was overall a great comic and I want to read the second book right now! Nov 05, Dominique Cottrell rated it really liked it. I've been reading this comic since the very beginning- I read the prologue as it was uploaded, I was one of the first to meet the characters, and I was one of the lucky few who contributed to the campaign to print SSSS. There's really only one thing I have to say you can't see for yourself- it's better the second time around.

You didn't think I would end there, would you? Stand still stay silent is a g I've been reading this comic since the very beginning- I read the prologue as it was uploaded, I was one of the first to meet the characters, and I was one of the lucky few who contributed to the campaign to print SSSS. Stand still stay silent is a graphic novel that explores an amazing and fully-fleshed world: Instead, it is met with a matter-of-fact "keep calm and carry on" mentality.

Even though the world has been met with an incurable rash disease that mutates familiar faces into horrific, violent, lovecraftian amalgamations of humanity, the governments don't panic. After the prologue reveals all of that to you, we skip forward ninety years to when the initial outbreak is over.

The monsters- called trolls- are still out there, but the inhabitants of the uninfected world have lost some of their terror. They know how to kill the trolls, they know how to reclaim land; and as we meet our first characters, the nordic council has just approved a request to send a research team into the infected lands. You have to have SOME mysteries left to discover. Now, detractors say that SSSS moves too slowly, and that it is difficult to tell characters apart, but I have never encountered either of these problems.

Unfortunately, I am not a reliable source because a I've been reading SSSS since it was born, and b I have mutant powers that let me read really quickly. No, that's not an exaggeration. Stories that seem slow to others seem totally regular to me. Sep 09, Alyssa rated it really liked it Shelves: Okay, I've had this book for a while already Was it this fall that the physical copies had been sent out?

Anyway, I haven't had time to read it before because I didn't want to carry that book all around with me by fear of damaging it. That's the thing, this book is of such great quality same thing as A Redtail's Dream which I also have and loved , it's a real treasure. So yeah, I've waited for so long to read this because 1 like I said, I didn't have time and 2 I much prefer to read in pap Okay, I've had this book for a while already So yeah, I've waited for so long to read this because 1 like I said, I didn't have time and 2 I much prefer to read in paper-book format which is why I didn't read the webcomic as soon as I finished ARTD.

That being said, I absolutely loved it. I'm very fond of the colors in particular, the base colors change for each chapter or part of the journey to be more precise gives each new place a new atmosphere as you progress into the story. Speaking of which, the story might seem to progress slowly, but I think you appreciate the artwork much more this way.

You have time to appreciate the details and immerse yourself into SSSS's world. Making each of them come from a different country, not speaking the same language and therefore not necessarily understanding each other was a huge challenge, but one that I believe Minna handled quite skillfully.

And now I kinda both want to hop on the wagon, keep reading the webcomic now as it keeps being updated online, but also wait for the next physical book to be out which could mean waiting for a very long time I guess. Sep 14, Monika Spancheska rated it liked it Shelves: It's pretty entertaining that I happened to be reading Stand Still, Stay Silent right around the same time I was reading Hinterkind , because these 2 stories are so similar. But, I already reviewed the first volume of Hinterkind , so let's talk about this series. Stand Still, Stay Silent is a web comic series that is as far as I know still ongoing.

This is a collected edition of Book 1, published in hardcover, but I read it on the website. Stand Still, Stay Silent is a complicated story to explain It's pretty entertaining that I happened to be reading Stand Still, Stay Silent right around the same time I was reading Hinterkind , because these 2 stories are so similar. Stand Still, Stay Silent is a complicated story to explain but I'll do my best. A virus strikes Europe, and to combat it, most of the Scandinavian countries close their borders specifically Iceland blocks all incoming and outgoing traffic from the island.

The series starts well before any of this happens, with a countdown, first by days and then by weeks, months and years of the virus spreading.

The Borrowed World

It follows a plethora of characters from all over Scandinavia, focusing mostly on Iceland. This first part was interesting, as we get to see how ordinary people deal with the spread of an unknown virus; some don't take it seriously, others are annoyed, some are terrified and some are all to prepared for the possibility of the world ending.

I found the numerous characters pleasant, but I didn't really connect to any of them, because they were all blonde white Nords, who got a few pages of screen-time and were essentially there as mouthpieces to explain how the world ended. The story really picks up after 90 years, with the formation of the team. Its pretty clear from the start that the group is poor, ill-prepares and somewhat dishonest in their intentions for 'exploring' No-Man's-Land. This lends a lot of tension to the proceedings, because we know the characters may not be prepared for what is expecting them, and it helps that readers don't know what is expecting them either.

We read about the monsters well before we see one, so the first time it happens the scene is extremely tense and well drawn. This leads me to a slight issue I'm having with this story, and that is it's tone. It's mostly light, with lots of jokes and characters underselling their reactions. This is a world that is barely surviving, most of mankind has been erased and yet they keep living their lives.

That's a dark gruesome sentiment, but the comic never really acknowledges it. There are scenes that are downright horrifying, like Sigrun stumbling onto the death-room, or the Icelandic military destroying a civilian vessel full of children for getting to close to their shore. Yet in the next moment we are back to joking around about bruises giving you skin cancer and eating sardines.

Additionally, it takes a really, really long time before anything really happens in the series. Don't get me wrong, this comic is gorgeous, with amazing, stunning artwork that is dripping in detail and atmosphere. The landscapes are beautiful the designs of the monsters and horrifying and creative, and each panel is full of little touches, like the heads of speakers appearing in world balloons when characters who are talking aren't on screen, or a flag denoting what language they are speaking in.

However, we spend the first 70 pages with characters that are irrelevant, and we only really get to Denmark around pages in. By the time we actually really experience the world, I was tempted to give up; we get pages upon pages devoted to world-building, geography, languages, but no real reason to care other than the curiosity of it. Despite this, things like the existence of magic and mages are not explained? The monsters are called giants and trolls, but they are still clearly just animals who are infected with the virus and mutated into Thing from Another World lookalikes.

But the existence of people with superpowers blessed by Freya? I'm tempted to say that the story may have flowed better page by page, but I was marathoning this in two goes, and I had a lot of trouble keeping up with the characters and plot, despite nothing really happening. Let's quickly go over the characters. The main five are: Tuuri and Lalli, two Finnish cousins, one of whom is a mechanic and the other one a mage and a scout; Emil a Swedish boy who is a soldier and explosives expert; Sigrun, a Norwegian woman who is another soldier and Mikkel a Danish healer and soldier. I liked all of them and they are decently distinct from each-other.

Tuuri is smart, young and very curious, speaks and reads all the Scandinavian languages including Danish, and gets easily excited. Mikkel is the grumpy deadpan 'dad' of the group, Sigrun is also overly excited and the defecto leader who is the most experienced in fighting the monsters. The two I liked the most, and cared the most about were Lalli and Emil. Emil is the one with the clearest character arc, since he starts off spoiled and cowardly, but also cares deeply about the others and gets drawn to Lalli, who is quiet, weird and a loner.

Lalli for his parts speaks little, goes off alone, has strange dreams and is the least in touch with technology or other parts of the world. Again, just to show off that the author could write it. I'm really not impressed by an author who can write stuff but can't find a good narrative to put his stuff in. The ending was rushed and weak and obviously a set-up for a sequel.

The whole book could have been edited down to several hundred pages less and used as the first act of a much better book, rather than stuffed full of padding in order to make a series. Such a shame for a book that started off so well. View all 12 comments. Jan 14, Jason rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a first in a new series by Orson Scott Card and the first time that I have read him in years.

I adore the Alvin Maker series and consider it one of the best Urban Fantasy series ever written. This novel is about a teenage boy named Danny. He is a little difficult to like and empathize with, as he is an incredibly smart ass and self centered youth, that may be a little too smart for his own good. The world building 4 star novel with an unbelievably awesome magic system and world building.

The world building here is a must read for Urban Fantasy lovers. Orson Scott Card has come up with a magic system that takes into account Norse mythology, present day technology, and even some Christianity. The magic is very interesting and left me wanting more. The plot is straight forward, and the protagonist goes through predictable trials and growth.

But, for the YA crowd and for Fantasy lovers, there is a lot to like here and even more to look forward to with future stories ahead. Mar 05, Kate rated it it was amazing. This is the first in a trilogy by Scott Orson Card and although it took me about a chapter or two to really get into the pacing and wonder of the novel I must admit I ended it with enthusiasm. The story takes place between two worlds, ours and a lost world that has been closed to us for years. Lost Gate provides a delightful explanation of ghosts, gods, werewolfs and other mythical and supernatural creatures. He even has an explanation for how our own Judeo Christian religions came into bei This is the first in a trilogy by Scott Orson Card and although it took me about a chapter or two to really get into the pacing and wonder of the novel I must admit I ended it with enthusiasm.

He even has an explanation for how our own Judeo Christian religions came into being. I loved the well drawn characters in the middle of the book and although at first I was a bit dubious of the lead character, Danny, and his wisdom I realized eventually that a god of course would have his wisdom combined with his teenage boy pranks and mistakes.

IF you love fantasy this one is for you, but have patience as there is much more to come. This isn't what I expected at all. There were things I liked and disliked about this book. The story was great, the world building was unique and the magic system was super cool. My problem was with the characters and the dialogue. Most of the characters were pretty unlikeable and the few I liked weren't relatable at all. Many of the characters were very crude and crass and I found the dialogue and character interactions uncomfortable.

I'm not sure if I'll carry on with this series. I want to see This isn't what I expected at all. I want to see what happens next in the story but I'm not sure if I can deal with the writing. I wasn't a fan of the audiobook narrator so maybe I'll read the rest of the series instead of listening. Jan 05, Katieb MundieMoms rated it it was ok Shelves: I've heard phenomenal things about his story telling and now I can understand why.

Orson kept me engaged with his story with his detailed mythology and world building. I felt like I was apart of the world while reading about Danny's journey. I'll admit, I didn't feel a connection to his main character through out the whole story and at times some scenes were not at all what I was expecting, and little graphic, taking too muc 2. I'll admit, I didn't feel a connection to his main character through out the whole story and at times some scenes were not at all what I was expecting, and little graphic, taking too much away from the story for me. Danny is a teenage mage in exhile with the rest of his family.

Living in the real world, they all have a magical ability, except Danny, or so they thought. Known as a Drekka to his family someone with out magical abilities , Danny is constantly picked on and left out of things. Danny soon discovers he's more powerful than any of them, as he's a Gatemage- someone who can make gates and open the gates to the other world that have since been closed.

Danny's power forces him to flee his family and he is on the run in the human world. Gatemage's are rare, the most powerful and feared. This once wholesome, at times smart mouth teen soon finds himself hanging with the wrong crowd. What I felt was a huge down fall with Danny's character was his continued lack of making the right choice. I felt his character went from one extreme to the next a little too quickly.

Stand Still, Stay Silent, Book 1

He soon discovers he can break into places by making gates and doesn't give a second thought to burglary. This side does show why many Gatemage's don't live long, as they can let their power get to their heads and don't heed with caution. I know he's a teenage boy, but I felt the continued need to moon people, and lust over a girl were mentioned a little too much and took away from Danny's story. The scene were Danny was almost molested by a married women completely threw me for a loop and I'll admit totally shocked me.

I did enjoy learning the rich history of Danny's people, through his journey. The parallel dialogues was at first a little confusing as Orson switches from Danny's story to the one of Wad, who's on the planet Westil. Wad himself was a character I was most interested in, and maybe that's due to the air of mystery that surrounds him.

I'm not sure if he's good or bad, but he is able to manipulate the courts so he's close to the King and Queen, and after serving them for some time he finds himself not only in love with the Queen but romantically linked to her as well keeping it family friendly. I was much more engaged with Wad's story than Danny's. Wad is a powerful character and I'm looking forward to reading more of his story in the sequel. While at times The Lost Gate can be a little complex and at times I felt a little lost with what was happening plot wise, I did enjoy the way in which Orson introduces "the gods" and the powers they have with the elements and things of the world, be it wind, animals, etc.

As I said before, the world building was beyond what I was expecting. The characters, the settings and the history that make up The Lost Gate are a showcase for Orson's story telling talent. I think The Lost Gate will appeal to YA readers who are fans of fantasy, as well as teenage boys not saying girls won't , but Danny is a character many boys will be able to connect with.


  1. The Lost Gate?
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  3. Social Capital and Health Inequality in European Welfare States.
  4. Stand Still, Stay Silent, Book 1 by Minna Sundberg.
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While I didn't get into the story as much as I wanted to, I am looking forward to reading the sequel. I would recommend this story for those 14 years and older, as there is some sexual content and very mild language. View all 8 comments. Feb 14, Eric rated it it was ok Recommends it for: Serious fans of Orson Scott Card. Here are the bits of that review that apply: Orson Scott Card is a very good storyteller, so even at his worst, his books are still worth reading.

The Borrowed World (The Borrowed World #1) by Franklin Horton

That being said, this entire novel felt like a It set up a lot of characters, a lot of history, and a good deal of how this alternative universe works, but not much happen When I finished this, I realized I felt almost identically about this book as I did about the last OSC book I had read, Seventh Son , which was also a first in a series.

It set up a lot of characters, a lot of history, and a good deal of how this alternative universe works, but not much happens in the story. There is very little action and a ton of discourse. He has not yet begun any sort of journey or quest Here are a few specific thoughts I had about this book: The first part, where Danny was in his family's compound, was the most interesting part of the book, and did a great job of pulling me into the story and the world.

I was convinced the book was going to be Percy Jackson meets American Gods. It was only after he left the compound that the story spun its wheels until the end. Most of what happened in DC and Florida was completely extraneous to the central plot. I didn't connect to many characters. Most seemed one-dimensional and wooden -- especially the Greek girl whose name I can't recall.

The book got bogged down with much more detail on gates and gate-making then it needed to, to the point where certain chapters were clunky and difficult to read. These chapters reminded me of The Grand Design , which I enjoyed reading, but only because that was real, actual science. As for the Man-in-the-Tree segments of the book, they didn't add much to the story of Danny North and his becoming a gatemage, and the start of chapters featuring Wad marked points where I was always tempted to put the book down.

Lastly, I wish I didn't read the Afterword, because Card admits to rushing to write the novel amid distractions -- "I wrote a chapter nearly every day" -- to make a publishing deadline. It makes me think that if he didn't have to rush it to press, it would have been tighter and a better book, which is what I hope the next book in the series manages, even though it is doubtful I'd ever read it. Jul 26, Martha rated it liked it Shelves: I am of mixed minds about this book.

I've read other Orson Scott Card books loved Ender's Game and some of the sequels and this had many of the same characteristics - precocious boy perhaps too precocious coming into his own to save the world with his unique skills. While the plots move along quickly there are two alternating plots in different worlds that naturally collide at the end ,the big climax feels rushed and I am of mixed minds about this book.

While the plots move along quickly there are two alternating plots in different worlds that naturally collide at the end ,the big climax feels rushed and disappointing and the two plots don't come together in a very satisfying way. But perhaps that is because this is the first book of a new series, which I didn't realize when I started the novel. It would have been nice to have had a more satisfying ending rather than just a lead in to the next book.

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There were many parts of the story I did not care for, but overall the magical worlds created are interesting and the story drew me in. I will read more in this series, but I won't be waiting impatiently to do so. Jul 22, Allie rated it did not like it Shelves: I dare anyone to find an Orson Scott Card book that doesn't talk about sexual molestation or naked boys or slutty girls or pedophilia or plain ol' weird ass situations; and I'm not just talking figuratively.

Of course I know what it means to 'moon' someone, but Mr. Card took it to the next level by describing, in cringe worthy detail, what it means to 'star' someone. I don't find toilet humour funny, and I'm still not sure what the point was in including not only this description, but othe I dare anyone to find an Orson Scott Card book that doesn't talk about sexual molestation or naked boys or slutty girls or pedophilia or plain ol' weird ass situations; and I'm not just talking figuratively. I don't find toilet humour funny, and I'm still not sure what the point was in including not only this description, but other sexual happenings as well.

Don't get me wrong: I don't have anything against anything sexual as long as it's relevant to the story. I just think the author is a sexual weirdo. Read the one and two star reviews for this book. Jul 02, Malcolm Everett rated it did not like it Shelves: The afterword by the author about the writing of the book was the best part. It was interesting to me that the idea kernel for this book took 33 years to pop into a full-fledged work. By the way, this book is not appropriate for young children, despite what the plot synopsis, character ages, and writing style may suggest. The Highs Gate Magery: The magic system was awesome.

Portals are an inherently fun concept. The premise of the story is also fairly attention-grabbing: The gate between Earth and the land of Gods Westil has been hidden for centuries, making it impossible for the mages left in the human world to return home. There is an intense rivalry between the different mage families, and to prevent war, the groups have promised to rid themselves of unfair advantages. Thus, any person who shows signs of gatemagery must be killed to ensure that no family can return to Westil and strengthen their powers.

I was confused by the alternating perspective at first because I thought that it was a flash-forward sequence for Danny. On the third POV shift, I finally realized the story was that of a completely different character, Wad. The Lows Inconsistent Protagonist: At first, Danny seems like the bookish underdog, but he quickly becomes an expert liar who feels no remorse for the consequences. Key Characters Arrive Too Late: With so many cool avenues to take with the gate magic concept, the story moves in ridiculous directions instead.

Danny uses his powers to shoplift from Walmart, pass toilet paper through a stall, and…go to high school? With that approach, there would be all sorts of opportunities for humorous misunderstandings and interesting conflicts. Lack of Cool Factor: The action scenes felt forced and require great suspension of disbelief, most notably view spoiler [when Danny finds a family tied up in their basement as well as when he and Eric confront the black market dealers hide spoiler ].

The revelatory moment and climax occur in a high school gym class. External factors drive much of the plot, mainly by someone finding Danny and confronting him about his powers. That type of structure made the plot feel random and disconnected. It seemed like Card was writing by the seat of his pants and went with the first ideas that came to him. As comedians know, the first idea is rarely the best one. Apr 05, Julie rated it did not like it Shelves: The ratings for this book seem high, so I know that I am in the minority on this one. I've read 2 other books by Orson Scott Card and enjoyed both of them.

They've had good imaginative plots and make a fun story, which is why I picked this book to listen with my year old son. The story is based on ancient gods who still exist on earth with diminished powers and live mostly hidden from the rest of humanity. They are waiting for a gate mage to be born and create a Great Gate which will The ratings for this book seem high, so I know that I am in the minority on this one.

They are waiting for a gate mage to be born and create a Great Gate which will help to enhance their powers. The mythology and descriptions of the old gods was interesting and made for a great starting plot. Granted, ancient mythology has spun off so many series, it has almost grown in popularity to compete with the vampire books, but they are fun and even educational.

The main character for this book is Danny North, a boy who at first seems to have no talents, but develops into a mage with immense magical power. As his power grows, I thought his personality in this book diminished. He is a year old boy and other than his magical skills, showed no personality or greatness. The characters in this book seem stilted and spend too much time explaining the science behind gates and mythology.

As many people mentioned, OSC commits the sin of 'telling vs. I listened to the audiobook narration. Not sure if this was the writing or the audio performance, but the story was not that engaging. There is a scene in the book where a married woman, physically attempts to molest Danny. The descriptions are graphic and definitely made this no longer a children's or middle grade book. Danny breaks away, but this scene is mentioned again and again throughout the book. I didn't think the scene advanced the plot or developed the character, but was a lame attempt at writing for an adolescent audience.

Overall, I have a hard time recommending this book to anyone but teenage boys -- inappropriate for younger kids and uninteresting for anyone else. Dec 12, Brent rated it did not like it.

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I admit that I initially found the book entertaining and engrossing. But, unfortunately, Card has the tendency to push the sexual content envelope in some of his novels--and did so here when I was about halfway into the book. I have reached a point in my life where no matter how good of a read the book might be, it is not worth completing if it contains "crap". In this case, it was all the more ridiculous because the incident did not appear germane to the plot whatsoever.

Aside from the "crap", I I admit that I initially found the book entertaining and engrossing. Aside from the "crap", I found myself liking the novel less and less as I progressed through it. The protogonist, who started out likable, intelligent, and insightful seemed to cultivate all of the converse attributes.

Consequently, it was not that difficult to put it down when I reached the incident. This was the third book by Card that I have stopped reading because of content It has sullied my view of him as an effective, inventive storyteller--it appears he now relies more on shock-value and distractions rather than story fidelity. Aug 19, Erica rated it really liked it Shelves: So I've been listening to the Mither Mages books in conjunction with the Hex Hall series - I am listening to these ones at work and the Hex Hall books in my car, in case it seems like I've got an earplug from each story in each ear, playing at the same time!

I'm not that crazy - and they're good bookends to each other, mirroring and contrasting in a lot of fun ways. The stories are similar: Ok, so a lot of books are like that. Yeah, we've been here before. He doesn't get to go to a magicking school or be discovered an apprenticed!

He goes on the run, instead! And it's all hijinks and hilarity from there, only not really. Yeah, some of Danny's adventures are a bit over-the-top.


  • The Lost Gate (Mither Mages, #1) by Orson Scott Card?
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  • He's a trickster, which appeals to me, but even he shouldn't be quite as quick as he is for his age. I like that he was pretty clueless about how the world really works but, at the same time, I thought there were many other things he shouldn't have known. I would cite them but I forgot to write this all up when I finished listening to it and have already thrown away my notes so this will just have to be vague. I know I did have a "Yay! Shout-out to the Library of Congress!

    I liked the story, though. It was entertaining, I grinned quite a few times, I was often impressed with people following their own values even if those values didn't match up with good-society values though there's an inordinate amount of good-society values going on among people who have no reason to have such a moral compass and characters, though maybe not deep or complex, staying mostly true to themselves.

    Oil Refinery - Gmod DarkRP (Found Crude Oil, Drilled it, Pumped It and Made 3.5 Million Dollars)

    Feb 17, Ken-ichi rated it it was ok Shelves: This book is nerdy in a bad way. The first sign of nerdiness is the premise: I actually thought that sounded pretty cool, but I am a nerd. Louise also a nerd thought it sounded pretty lame, and I can see where she's coming from: Definitely a strong whiff of fan fiction yes, I skimmed the afterword where OSC describes the distant origins of his idea; doesn't make it feel any less derivative Second sign of nerdiness: But the kind of heavy-handed pseudo-narration that occurs between characters in this book crosses a line into the literary equivalent of xtranormal.

    If the story doesn't concern the particulars of a brand, I don't feel like it belongs in the book. If a character is contemplating the nature of Google Maps, for example, then sure, mention the brand. Otherwise, plain old "map" is a perfectly good verb. Overall, the story was diverting enough to keep me reading, so if you're a diehard OSC fan you'll probably enjoy it. I don't feel compelled to continue the series. Nov 21, Virginia rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Sarah Poon, Adam Heine.

    As always, what really sparkles in Card's books is his sarcastic and witty dialog. The rhythm of his words as his characters insult with great affection each other is always a highlight to me. That said, I enjoyed the book although I felt that a lot of it was a set-up for the later books. It's understandable since there is a lot of worldbuilding going on and a magic system that takes time to explain.

    That's the other thing. I felt as if I could see the workings behind Card's thinking as he was As always, what really sparkles in Card's books is his sarcastic and witty dialog. I felt as if I could see the workings behind Card's thinking as he was writing the book. I don't know if it's because I've been reading a lot of articles on writing lately or whatever, but it seemed as if I glimpsed behind the curtain a bit and that kinda threw me out of the moment. However, overall, I'm glad I read it and it ended satisfactorily and I am looking forward to the next. Just not with baited breath like some other sequels I'm waiting for.

    It's been 11 months since I read this book and for some reason, almost every other morning when I feed my toddler his oatmeal breakfast, I think of this book. I keep remembering vaguely a scene where Danny is talking to the couple who "adopted" him and he is saying how all the mundane daily things they did for him made him feel as if he were part of a family and that is what taught him what love is. I am completely butchering the scene or of what I recall. I keep returning to this moment because sometimes, feeding my toddler his oatmeal can be difficult, but I believe that the daily ritual of feeding him and caring for him is an embodiment of love.

    I seriously have to re-read this book just to have a better understanding of why it sticks in my mind so vividly. Therefore, simply because it has had such a profound impact although, much stupider sounding now that I've written it out , I am adding a star, thus making it a 4 star book. Jan 21, J. Lawrence rated it it was amazing. A slick magic system, complete with a mythological feel, in today's world. I really enjoyed this one.

    The main character reminded me a lot of Ender, which was a treat because I enjoyed those books too. I have already ordered The Gate Thief. Dec 09, Stefan rated it liked it Shelves: Fast forward to the 21st century. The North family are the many-times-removed children of the Norse gods, now living on a secluded compound in Virginia. The ability to create Gates is the most powerful and most feared skill, because any family capable of creating Gates would quickly become strong enough to eliminate its rivals. As Danny flees his family, he takes up with a small-time criminal, ends up in Washington DC, meets some odd characters, and gradually discovers more about his powers.

    Danny is unfortunately a fairly annoying protagonist, filling the novel with juvenile humor and smart-alec back-and-forth banter that frankly becomes grating as the story continues. The second story line follows a mysterious, nameless young man on the planet Westil, who arrives, sans most of his memories, in the middle of a courtly power struggle. On the plus side, The Lost Gate has an interesting magical system. Orson Scott Card never provides a Brandon Sanderson-style chart of the various abilities, and instead gradually introduces the various options as the story progresses.

    Even more interesting is the setup of the fictional universe, with the two worlds, connected in the past but now separated, influencing each other. The way Card explains the history of the various religions and fictional creatures on Earth by fitting them into his magic system is very nifty. Card also uses some plot devices that are simply too convenient and transparent to be plausible.

    Feb 11, Dave rated it it was ok Shelves: As Card explains in the Afterword, he considers this to be his best magic system, but a system itself does not make a good novel. Where this novel lacks, and where his series with Ender and Alvin succeeded, is in the formation of the story as well as good characters. The story starts with Danny North at the age of thirteen. Danny is part of the North i. Norse family of magicians, who take on titles like Thor and Odin to represent their office, rather than those names coming from individuals.

    The North family is one of several families who come from Westil, a world that has been lost to the families on Earth ever since the trickster Loki also of the North family closed all the gates. The other key piece of knowledge is that the families have agreed that gatemages, such as Loki, are too dangerous for one family to have and the others lack, so they monitor each other to ensure that no family has such a huge advantage.

    He repeatedly makes the same mistakes over and over. Of course, thirteen-year-olds do make a lot of mistakes, but it seems to never end with Danny, even when he is sixteen in the later chapters. From my perspective, I felt there was a huge problem with the specific premise of Danny and his powers. According to what we are told, the separation of Earth from Westil has resulted in magicians becoming weaker and weaker over time. In fact, we are told that they have become so weak that simply gating to Westil and coming back will result in their power increasing fold or even more.

    To be sure, Orson Scott Card made his primary characters like Ender and Alvin extremely special as well, but the premise behind why they were as smart and as powerful as they were made much more sense than what Card has attempted to do here. To close on a bit more positive note, this is a fairly quick read, and there are some parts which are fun and interesting.

    I cannot give this a rating of higher than two stars though, because there are so many better books by Orson Scott Card to read, let alone other authors. Apr 07, J. Percy Jackson and Magnus Chase meet Deadpool. Modern fantasy Norse fiction young boy runaway he can makes 'paths' descendant of Loki. Other uses of gates 1 3 Dec 28, Videos About This Book. About Orson Scott Card. Orson Scott Card is the author of the novels Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Speaker for the Dead, which are widely read by adults and younger readers, and are increasingly used in schools.