Have His Carcase: Lord Peter Wimsey Book 8 (Lord Peter Wimsey Series)

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Two novels after they meet and he is still convinced she must marry him and she is just as determined not to. Their relationship adds a lot of spice and interest to an already fascinating murder case. While I will leave you to discover it for yourself, I will say that it is one of Dorothy L. Lord Peter and Harriet Vane are up against a very intelligent adversary and there is even a chapter devoted to a specific code used in a certain communication to the victim. As the chapter moves on, we follow Lord Peter and Harriet on their quest to crack the code. There are even diagrams showing how they eventually deduced the solution, and it is brilliant.

This is one of the best novels I have read in this series. It has all the ingredients one could wish for in a great mystery story. And just when I thought we had it all figured out, the whole mixture gets shaken up again and we all put our thinking caps back on for more effort. I have no idea how she did it, but Dorothy L. Sayers had me involved as if I were somewhere right in the middle of the sleuthing process.

This was an excellent read and would be particularly enjoyable for all fans of Dorothy L. View all 20 comments. The best remedy for a bruised heart is not, as so many people seem to think,repose upon a manly bosom I think Have His Carcase is the book where Sayers begins to make the transition between a standard Golden Age detective story, and the much more interesting and engaging I find novels which make up most of the Wimsey-Vane stories. As much as the earlier novels are fun to read, with some very entertaining secondary characters, I think this is really the point where both Harriet and Peter star The best remedy for a bruised heart is not, as so many people seem to think,repose upon a manly bosom As much as the earlier novels are fun to read, with some very entertaining secondary characters, I think this is really the point where both Harriet and Peter start to acquire the depth that they really need as characters if the reader is supposed to buy their relationship as being able to function on a level other than the standard, trope, Designated Love Interest one.

The plot was, I think, overly convoluted, artificial and implausible, although still miles better than, say, Clouds of Witness I do not think I can ever contemplate the denouement of that book without cringing a little at the sheer implausibility of it. I'm not sure how it could have been thought to be a suicide at all, given the violence of the death-wound. I did, however, like the way in which Sayers wove the solving of the mystery in with the fact that Harriet is, herself, a mystery writer, and even a certain slyly humourous acknowledgement of the conventions of the Golden Age detective novel - I was terribly amused at Harriet's thinking that it would be very fun if the man on the rock turned out to be dead, and would therefore be found by a famous murder mystery writer, and then the dead-pan "Harriet's luck was in.

There were also points in which I felt that the plot could be trimmed slightly - the solving of the code, for example. My eyes just glazed over and I skipped forwards several pages. While I'm sure Dorothy L Sayers was delighted to show us all that she had constructed a code that actually worked, I frankly couldn't have given a monkeys. The verbal sparring between Harriet and Peter was a treat as always, and it was their interaction that provided most of the tension and the drama. I loved how much more we got to see of Peter outside of the foppish persona he's built up for himself, and how Harriet is being developed much more, warts and all.

The tentative attraction that developed in Strong Poison is developed here into an even more tentative courtship that is slowly, ever so slowly being built on, and which will eventually climax in Gaudy Night. I don't think it's as strong a novel as Gaudy Night - then again, that's one of my favourite ever books - but I do think it's well on the way to developing the characters which are the reason that it is my favourite. This is the eighth book featuring Lord Peter Wimsey.

Have His Carcase

The book opens with Harriet Vane on a walking tour, when she finds the body of a man on a beach. His throat has been cut and, with the tide coming in, Harriet attempts to contact the police — but thi This is the eighth book featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. His throat has been cut and, with the tide coming in, Harriet attempts to contact the police — but this involves such a long journey that the body has vanished by the time she manages to alert anyone.

The next morning the police and press are all gathered at the seaside watering place where Harriet is staying, and then Lord Peter Wimsey arrives. The victim turns out to be a Russian professional dancer who, not only was paid to dance with the elderly ladies who visit the hotel, but had actually proposed marriage to one of them — a very wealthy, and seemingly heartbroken lady, named Mrs Weldon.

Sayers did not only create a fantastic sleuth in Wimsey, but gave him a good array of friends and family to flesh out the books; so we have the intrepid Bunter tailing a suspect and a mention of his new brother in law, Parker, as well as lots of local police input. Overall, an enjoyable addition to the series and I look forward to reading on. We have an older woman, desperate for love; her younger lover who wants an empire; and a son who sees his inheritance disappearing into the clutches of a gigolo.

And so the scene is set for a murder. It could have been, but This is one of the most complicated murders I have ever read. But also one of the most entertaining. We have the involvement o 4. We have the involvement of the Russians, a little reminiscent of the missing Russian Princess Anastasia, and a whole plethora of red herrings for Lord Peter and Miss Vane to fish through.

View all 8 comments. Where I got the book: Continuing my re-read of the Wimsey books. Her suitor Lord Peter Wimsey is quickly on the scene, but the investigators are puzzled. All the signs seem to point to a particular perpetrator, but his alibi for the time of death is rock solid. Something is wrong with the picture--but w Where I got the book: Something is wrong with the picture--but what? Having waded through Five Red Herrings , I now feel like I'm on the downhill slope of this reading marathon. Sayers simply seems to hit her stride with Have His Carcase and the energy doesn't quit till Busman's Honeymoon , where Wimsey and Vane simply become too quotation-ridden to be believable.

One of the beauties of Have His Carcase is the introduction of the inside of Harriet Vane's head, which is a delightfully down-to-earth counterpart to Wimsey's flights of fancy. She is practical, forthright and yet never overly wonderful--her insecurities and mistakes are laid bare for all to see, and she's definitely not always reasonable where Wimsey is concerned.

The introduction of a fully-rounded character into the Wimsey books forces Sayers to make Wimsey himself more vulnerable, even as the list of his accomplishments stretches toward the exaggerated. The only place where my attention flags a bit in this book is the long explanation of the code-cracking, although it is very clever and no doubt puzzle buffs must thoroughly enjoy it.

I noticed, for the first time, that my edition was typeset the old-fashioned way, making the code grids rather wobbly. I'm so glad I kept it, because it reminds me of how books used to be before all this newfangled computer stuff came in. I would truly like to own the yellow-jacketed Gollancz hardbacks the form in which I discovered the series, in my school library but I imagine they are collector's items and priced accordingly.

If I thought really hard about this novel I would probably discover its flaws; Sayers herself cheerfully admitted that she screwed up sometimes. But I was too busy reading it View all 17 comments. Not as enjoyable as I was expecting. Peter and Harriet are, of course, rubbing along very complexly here, with suppressed romantic sentiment mostly Peter, but not all and resentment mostly Harriet, but not all. There is only one real eruption between them; the rest of the time they take carefully calculated shots, watch each other too closely, and very rarely get wrapped up in the puzzle and accidentally slide towards partnership.

I realize that the endless back-and-forth with layered theories and time tables and who-done-its and how-done-its is how this book works. Unfortunately, I find that style with the endless theorizing extremely tedious. But I think my real problem is that after all that commentary, those layered narratives and fictions, Peter does what Peter does — what a golden age detective does — and tootles off into the sunset, crime and victim s slotted in as just another pretty puzzle, just another story. That sort of thing rubs me exactly the wrong way. Aug 26, Jeanette rated it liked it. The case is good but this one for me was just overlong.

Bunter is off on his own doing some inquiries too. And travel abounds all around. The part at the beginning when Harriet is just "thinking" on her walk was 5 star. I like these more when they are majority "in company" I think. Some of the language is truly dated and it holds completely different meanings now- but that was not a deterrent to me, just an observation. Dago being a favorite and meaning more than just being French or dark Mediterranean or Italian but beyond that "foreign" - only in capital letters.

Have His Carcase (Lord Peter Wimsey #8) by Dorothy L. Sayers

To tell you the truth, this one with all the varying logistics for "no footprints" and "fresh blood" etc. Not my favorite, but not the poorest- at least this one raised some witty eye brows and didn't have half the dialogue in dialect. There's a pivotal point within all of this crux that I am fairly sure differs now in this decade, with more chemical and elemental property's knowledge about the biologic from the forensics established here in this tale as "true" in the late 's.

I might be wrong. Yet in time when I have more access, I'm going to look it up or ask a doctor who has done autopsies. After her highly-publicized near-conviction in the murder trial of her former lover in Strong Poison , mystery writer Harriet Vane decides to get away from it all by taking a solitary walking tour in the countryside. While lunching on the beach, she stumbles upon a corpse. There are no one else's footprints in the sand, but other evidence suggests this was not suicide Harriet doesn't want to ask Lord Peter, who cleared her name once before, to do it a second time, but he shows up anyway.

As t After her highly-publicized near-conviction in the murder trial of her former lover in Strong Poison , mystery writer Harriet Vane decides to get away from it all by taking a solitary walking tour in the countryside. As the two investigate the young dancer's death, one odd detail and after another piles up and the case becomes more complicated rather than less.

This is the type of mystery that has a lot of precise time calculations and decoding of ciphers, which I'm not too interested by, but the dialogue is tightly written and often quite funny. Sayers has a remarkable ability to shift quickly and smoothly from snide asides one moment and intense emotion a minute later. I really loved rereading this one. I knew I would, when I revisited the opening lines The best remedy for a bruised heart is not, as so many people seem to think, repose upon a manly bosom.

Much more efficacious are honest work, physical activity, and the sudden acquisition of wealth. After being acquitted of murdering her lover, and indeed, in consequence of that acquittal, Harriet Vane found all three specifics abundantly at her disposal; and although Lord Peter Wimsey, with a touching faith I really loved rereading this one. After being acquitted of murdering her lover, and indeed, in consequence of that acquittal, Harriet Vane found all three specifics abundantly at her disposal; and although Lord Peter Wimsey, with a touching faith in tradition, persisted day in and day out in presenting the bosom for her approval, she showed no inclination to recline upon it.

The way Harriet and Peter interact is brilliant and oh, how good it is to have Harriet saying no to Peter so determinedly, neither falling in love with him instantly because he's that perfect, nor agreeing to him to stop him pestering her which it is implied she did with her previous lover, nor playing him for a fool: Bunter gets some very good moments too, and the whole scenario is satisfyingly convoluted.

Granted, if you've read it before, you do get the urge to shake Peter for making certain assumptions, and the code-breaking part becomes even more boring, but overall, it stands up well to a second or third reading. After reading Gaudy Night and hearing Peter and Harriet refer to "the Wilvercombe affair", I was intrigued and naturally wanted to read more about these two crazy kids solving another mystery. Rather misleadingly, the book that details this case is not called "The Wilvercombe Affair", and doesn't even have the word Wilvercombe in the title.

Anyway, the mystery in a nutshell: Harriet Vane, a couple y After reading Gaudy Night and hearing Peter and Harriet refer to "the Wilvercombe affair", I was intrigued and naturally wanted to read more about these two crazy kids solving another mystery. Harriet Vane, a couple years after she is found innocent of murdering Philip Boynes, goes on a walking holiday by herself. She's wandering along the beach one day when she spots what looks suspiciously like a dead body. Because she is Harriet Vane, and this is a Sayers mystery, here's what she thinks next: It's always some placid laborer or night-watchman who finds corpses.

It looks a lot like a suicide, but a Highly Suspicious One.

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Yes, his lordship the delightful Peter Wimsey skips into town, and he and Harriet start solving the mystery while having marvelous romantic tension, witty banter, and one explosive fight that was very upsetting for me, even though I've read Gaudy Night and know it all turns out okay. Let me repeat what I say in every single Dorothy Sayers review that I write: He is absolutely divine, and I won't just let you take my word for it and will let him speak for himself. You need not shrink and tremble.

I am not going to do it. When I kiss you, it will be an important event - one of those things which stand out among their surroundings like the first time you tasted li-chee. It will not be an unimportant sideshow attached to a detective investigation. You will kindly refer to Miss Vane in a proper way and spare me the boring nuisance of pushing your teeth out at the back of your neck.

Also I think there's another one that takes place after Gaudy Night , but I'm not sure. In this entry in the Lord Peter Wimsey series of detective novels, we find the woman he loves, Harriet Vane, back on the scene. In fact, the story opens with her on a solitary walking tour in Cornwall, discovering a body on the shore. Lord Peter, guessing that this may mean trouble for her since she has previously been mixed up in murder , flies heroically to her rescue.

Not that his heroism—or their romance—is portrayed in the sort of terms that are recognizable to most present-day readers. He In this entry in the Lord Peter Wimsey series of detective novels, we find the woman he loves, Harriet Vane, back on the scene. She treats these offhand inquiries with all the respect they deserve, so the reader has to read both the tension and the romance between the lines.

Upon discovering the corpse, Harriet has the presence of mind to realize that the rising tide will soon wash the body away, so she gathers what evidence she can before leaving the scene to try to contact the police. A good thing, too, because the body is indeed gone by the time the police arrive. Only one person had a serious motive for murder, which made it not very mysterious for me; all the other suspects seemed to have little reason to be involved. Still, I very much enjoyed the characters and especially the subtle dance between Harriet and Lord Peter.

Another of the BBC's fantastic radioplays. I can't think why I didn't feel like listening to them for a while -- they're great, and very good company when I'm crocheting. I'm going to blame essay deadlines and such. Everyone's very well cast, of course, and the plot is easy to follow; maybe easier than when I read it, though I'm not sure if that's the audio or the fact that I have read it before, albeit the novel, not the radioplay adaptation.

It suffers from a sad lack of Bunter and Parker, though. I love the way Ian Carmichael plays Peter's feelings for Harriet. Just the right tone.


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And Harriet's dry responses are brilliant. Ah, be still my beating heart. The attraction for this one is very much the way Harriet and Peter play off each other, not so much the mystery. Strong Poison was about the point at which I started to care about the overarching character development, originally, and it became acute by Have His Carcase.

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I appreciated this one much better this time around. It's still an extremely clever and enjoyable mystery about how fact and fiction sometimes affect each other. I'll be writing a full I appreciated this one much better this time around. I'll be writing a full review shortly. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. Sponsored Products are advertisements for products sold by merchants on Amazon. When you click on a Sponsored Product ad, you will be taken to an Amazon detail page where you can learn more about the product and purchase it. To learn more about Amazon Sponsored Products, click here. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? Learn more about Amazon Prime. When Harriet Vane finds a dead body on the beach, she and Lord Peter Wimsey must solve a murder when all the evidence has washed out to sea.

Harriet Vane has gone on vacation to forget her recent murder trial and, more importantly, to forget the man who cleared her name—the dapper, handsome, and maddening Lord Peter Wimsey.

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She is alone on a beach when she spies a man lying on a rock, surf lapping at his ankles. His throat has been cut, and his blood has drained out onto the sand. As the tide inches forward, Harriet makes what observations she can and photographs the scene. Finally, she goes for the police, but by the time they return the body has gone. Only one person can help her discover how the poor man died at the beach: Lord Peter, the amateur sleuth who won her freedom and her heart in one fell swoop.

Have His Carcase is the 8th book in the Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries, but you may enjoy the series by reading the books in any order. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dorothy L. Sayers including rare images from the Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College. Read more Read less. Books In This Series 15 Books. Page 1 of 1 Start Over Page 1 of 1. Kindle Cloud Reader Read instantly in your browser.

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A Freshly Baked Cozy Mystery, book 4. Alerted to the discovery by a friend, Lord Peter Wimsey arrives, and he and Harriet start their investigations. The victim is identified as Paul Alexis, a young man of Russian extraction, employed by the local hotel as a professional dancing partner. The police tend to the view that Alexis's death was suicide and that he had cut his own throat. Wimsey and Harriet discover that in the period leading up to his death Alexis, an avid reader of Ruritanian romances , had believed himself to be a descendant of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia.

A series of coded letters received from an unknown source convinced him that he was being called to return to Russia to take his place as the new rightful Tsar. Alexis had recently been engaged to a rich widow in her fifties, Mrs Weldon. Her son, Henry Weldon, ten years older than his mother's lover and by all appearances a simple and brutish man, is appalled at the prospect of his mother's remarriage to a gigolo , and at his potential loss of inheritance.

He travels to Wilvercombe to monitor the investigation while ostensibly comforting his mother after her loss. Weldon appears to be a likely murder suspect, but he has an unshakeable alibi for the time of Alexis's death — as do a large number of other possible suspects. Alexis's death, staged to look like suicide, is gradually revealed to be the result of an ingenious murder plot that played upon Alexis's fantasies.

He had been lured to the rock by his anonymous correspondent who urged him to be ready to meet a 'Rider from the Sea', a rider who it was said would be carrying instructions for his onward journey to Warsaw. Once at the rock, Alexis met his death at the hand of the murderer who had ridden his horse along the beach through the incoming tide to avoid leaving tracks.